La pésima economía neoclásica del cambio climático

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Autores

Steve Keen

Resumen

Las predicciones de los economistas del daño a la economía causado por el cambio climático son demasiado optimistas en comparación con las advertencias de los científicos sobre el daño a la biosfera. Esto se debe ante todo a que los economistas predicen los daños usando tres métodos espurios: suponen que un 90% del PIB no será afectado por el cambio climático porque ocurre puertas adentro; usan la relación actual entre temperatura y PIB como proxy del impacto del calentamiento global, y encuestas que diluyen las advertencias extremas de los científicos con las expectativas optimistas de los economistas. Nordhaus ha malinterpretado la literatura científica para justificar el uso de una función suave que describa el daño del cambio climático al PIB. Cuando se corrigen estos errores los daños pueden ser al menos un orden de magnitud peores que los que predicen los economistas y tan graves que amenazan la supervivencia de la civilización humana.

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JEL:

D31
E44
Q51

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Esta obra está bajo licencia internacional Creative Commons Reconocimiento-NoComercial-CompartirIgual 4.0.

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